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CEE Summer Quarter 2020

June 22, 2020 – August 15, 2020

Current CEE Students


Current students in CEE are able to take courses this summer in order to continue making progress toward degree during the extended COVID-19 campus closure.  Signing up for summer quarter courses is just like signing up for any other quarter and done through Axess.  Summer quarter enrollment is now open.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  We fully expect to offer all of the classes listed that are below this upcoming summer.  However, due to the uncertainty associated with the university’s and department’s COVID-19 response, some courses may have to be cancelled as we get closer to the start of summer quarter.  For students enrolled in any of these courses, we will inform you as soon as any changes are made.

Most Relevant Summer Courses for Current CEE Students (sorted by major and program)

CEE Undergraduate Majors
  A/E
    CEE 107S (required Engineering Depth)
    CEE 177L (approved as Depth Elective in Energy)
  Architectural Design
    CEE 120A (Required Depth)
    CEE 146S/ENGR60 (Engineering Fundamental Choice)
  Civil Engineering
    CEE 146S/ENGR60 (Required Depth for CE-Wet and CE-Dry Tracks)
    CEE 120A (Required Specialty for CE-Dry Track)
    CEE 107S (Specialty Elective for CE-Wet Track)
  EnvSE
    CEE 107S (Focus Elective for Urban)
    CEE 120A (Modeling/Analysis Tool/Skill)
    CEE 146S/ENGR60 (Required Focus for Urban; Modeling/Analysis Tool/Skill for all)
    CEE 170 (can substitute for CEE177 for Freshwater and Coastal)
    CEE 177L (Focus Elective for Urban)

CEE Master’s Degree Program
  A/E
    CEE 207S (Core Elective in Energy)
    CEE 277L (added as Energy Elective)
  ENV
    CEE 275D (Core Elective in Env. Management, Policy and Law)
    CEE 206 (added as Core Elective in Environmental Data, Statistics and Modeling)
    CEE 270M (added as Core Elective in Aquatic Chemistry/Biology and Process Engrg.)
  SDC
    CEE 244 (Required for SDC-Management; Skills Swimlane for all other Tracks)
    CEE 207S (added to the Energy Swimlane)
    CEE 277L (added to the Building, Infrastructure and Urban Systems Swimlane)
    CEE 285C (added to the Structures Swimlane)
    CEE 146S (required prerequisite for SDC; counts in Skills Swimlane)
    CEE 220A (prerequisite for CEE 220B and CEE 220C
  SEG
    CEE 206 (Core Course in Risk & Reliability)
    CEE 285C (Breadth Elective)

CEE Summer Quarter 2020 Course (in numerical order)

CEE 107S/207S – Understanding Energy

Instructor: D. Gragg
Units: 3

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy Prerequisites: Algebra.

CEE 120A/220A - Building Modeling for Design & Construction

Instruction: G. Katz

Units: 3

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation, and analysis. Prerequisites: None.

CEE 124 – Sustainable Development Studio

Instructor: M. Lepech

Units: 1

This 1-unit seminar will host speakers (academics, practitioners, graduate students) from across the Civil and Environmental Engineering domain to discuss projects, research, and topics of general interest to the Civil and Environmental Engineering discipline.  Prerequisite: None. (NOTE: This course is only offered annually during Summer Quarter.)

CEE 146S (ENGR 60) - Engineering Economics and Sustainability

Instructor: M. Lepech

Units: 3

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 (introductory calculus) or approved equivalent.


CEE 170/270M - Aquatic and Organic Chemistry for Environmental Engineering

Instructor: W. Mitch

Units: 3

This course provides a solid foundation in the most important aspects of general, aquatic and organic chemistry. Nearly all of aspects environmental engineering apply the chemistry concepts discussed in this course. Given that each of the chemistry subjects to be addressed are standalone classes, this class highlights only the most relevant material to environmental engineering. The class focuses on developing general background skills needed for subsequent classes in environmental engineering focusing on their applications, although certain applications will be discussed for illustration. Prerequisites: None. (NOTE: This course is only offered annually during Summer Quarter.)


CEE 177L/277L - Smart Cities and Communities

Instructor: R. Lechner

Units: 3

A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.  Prerequisites: None. (NOTE: This course is only offered annually during Summer Quarter.)


CEE 176G/276G - Sustainability Design Thinking

Instructor: G. Katz

Units: 3

Application of design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.  Prerequisite: None. (NOTE: This course is only offered annually during Summer Quarter.)


CEE 206 - Decision Analysis in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Instructor: A. Kiremidjian

Units: 3

Current challenges in selecting an appropriate site, alternate design, or retrofit strategy based on environmental, economic, and social factors can be best addressed through applications of decision science. Basics of decision theory, including development of decision trees with discrete and continuous random variables, expected value decision making, utility theory value of information, and elementary multi-attribute decision making will be covered in the class. Examples will cover many areas of civil and environmental engineering problems. Prerequisite: CEE 203 or equivalent course in basic probability and statistics.  (NOTE: This course is only offered annually during Summer Quarter.)

CEE 244 - Accounting and Finance for Engineers

Instructor: M. Lepech

Units: 3

Accounting is the common language of business.  A basic knowledge of accounting practices is essential for any aspiring leader in engineering, management, or entrepreneurship.  This course introduces concepts of financial accounting and cost accounting in firms.  Topics covered include financial accounting principles, balance sheets, income statements, statements of cash flows, fundamentals of cost accounting, cost allocation principles, management control systems, and master budgeting. Prerequisite: None.  (NOTE: This course is only offered annually during Summer Quarter.)

 

CEE 275D - Environmental Policy Analysis

Instructor: M. Mauter

Units: 3-4

Environmental policy formation is a complex process involving a large number of actors making value laden interpretations of scientifically complex phenomena. This course explores the origins of this complexity and its implications for the future of environmental decision making and policy-directed environmental engineering. We will begin by asking what good environmental policy looks like, including how we set policy for groups of individuals with diverse preferences, how we value preferences across space and time, and how we account for the deep uncertainty that permeates environmental systems. We then turn to how environmental policies are actually developed, exploring the technical, cognitive, organizational, and systemic barriers to implementing good policy. Finally, will explore the role of scientific evidence in shaping environmental policy and the mechanisms by which policy shapes engineering and science research. Students will gain familiarity with the existing theories, methods, and strategies used to set environmental policy; critically examine the embedded assumptions and inherent shortcomings of these approaches; and practice their thoughtful and ethical application to timely environmental challenges. Course Structure: This course combines a lecture-based introduction to critical material with extensive in-class discussion of daily readings from the policy analysis canon. As such, it is designed for PhD and Masters students across the university with an interest in exploring the effective role of science in setting public policy and comfort in reading primary literature. Upper level undergraduates are welcome with instructor consent. Assessment elements will include class participation, responses on 4 to 5 written assignments, and a take-home final. Occasional Friday recitation sessions will provide guidance on the application of policy analysis methods.  (NOTE: This course will not be offered this Autumn.)


CEE 285C - Strut-and-Tie Modeling for Structural Concrete

Instructor: S. Billington and K. Douglas

Units: 2

This course presents the concepts and application of strut-and-tie modeling (STM) for structural concrete elements.  Students will identify regions within structures where STM can be used for design, apply the methodology to locate and detail reinforcement, and check the capacity of their model.  Applications of the method will be illustrated for deep beams, corbels, post-tensioned anchorage zones, torsion resistance, and bridge components.  Various strut-and-tie models will be evaluated based on efficiency, economy, and performance.  Prerequisites: CEE 182 or equivalent introductory course in reinforced concrete design.  (NOTE: This course is only offered annually during Summer Quarter.)

How to Sign Up

Signing up for summer quarter courses is just like signing up for any other quarter and done through Axess.  Summer quarter enrollment is now open.

Frequently Asked Questions

When is summer quarter this year?

We have 8 weeks of instruction between June 22 and August 15, 2020 with final exams taking place on August 15-16, 2020.  (Yes, you read that correctly.  Summer Quarter is 8 weeks, not 10 weeks.  Thus, the content and the assignments move even more quickly since we are still offering the same number of units, and thus the same amount of content, over a shorter time period.)  For more information on the deadlines and dates associated with Summer Quarter, please visit the Stanford Registrar’s Academic Calendar.

When will enrollment for summer quarter 2020 be open?

The enrollment opening date for summer quarter 2020 was delayed by the University but is now open. You can now sign up for summer quarter courses through Axess.

Will these units count toward my MS Degree, Engineer Degree, or PhD Degree?

Yes. These are regular courses that are being taught by regular faculty or adjunct faculty in CEE.  With regard to how these courses will fit into your specific MS program, we’ve tried to provide guidance for each course described above.  However, for specific questions you should reach out to your program advisor.

How much time should I expect to spend on each course?

Each unit of credit represents, for the average student, approximately 2 hours of work outside of class for every 1 hour of class time. For a 10-week quarter, a 3-unit course would require a minimum time commitment of 9 hours per week. However, for the more compressed 8-week summer session, you should expect to spend closer to 11 hours per week. This is a general guide and the actual time commitment may vary depending on the course and the individual student.

What does the tuition cost for summer courses?

Tuition and fees for courses are a little different than for regular academic year courses since you pay by the individual unit that is taken.  You can find information on summer quarter tuition and fees here.

If I have received a financial aid package for graduate studies, can I apply this aid towards tuition costs for summer online courses?

Probably not.  In most cases, financial aid from CEE cannot be applied to summer quarter tuition since financial aid is dispersed evenly across the three regular academic quarters.

I am working as a Research Assistant (RA), Teaching Assistant (TA), or Course Assistant (CA) this summer.  Can my RA/TA/CA tuition stipend be used to pay for summer online course tuition?

Yes. 

I have a major fellowship that provides for a tuition stipend during the summer quarter (Knight-Hennessey Scholars, NSF Graduate Research Fellow, US Army Advanced Civil School (ACS) Program, etc.).  Can my fellowship tuition stipend be used to pay for summer online course tuition?

Yes.  

If I find that the summer online experience is not working for me, can I drop a summer course? 

The same drop-add deadlines apply to summer quarter as regular academic quarters.  For Summer 2020, this is July 7, 2020. 

Can I “shop” a course, similar to a regular academic quarter?

The mechanics of signing up for and planning to teach an online class are new to all of us.  Please don’t view the first couple weeks of Summer Quarter as a “shopping” period.

I’m an admitted CEE MS student who will be starting my degree in Fall 2020.  Can I take online classes this summer to count towards my degree?

Yes!  We absolutely would encourage you to take advantage of this unique set of summer offerings.  Please note that not all of the courses listed above are available to incoming MS students (since you are not officially a Stanford student – yet.)  For information on how to enroll in summer quarter courses as an admitted MS student, please visit the CEE Summer Quarter for Admitted MS Students webpage.

I’m an admitted CEE MS student who would like to defer the start of my degree program until a future quarter due to COVID-19.  Can I take online classes this summer to meet prerequisite requirements and count these units towards my degree?

Yes!  We absolutely would encourage you to take advantage of this unique set of summer offerings.  Please note that not all of the courses listed above are available to incoming MS students who have deferred (since you are not officially a Stanford student – yet.)  For information on how to enroll in summer quarter courses as an admitted MS student who has deferred the start of their degree, please visit the CEE Summer Quarter for Admitted MS Students webpage.

Who can I ask for more information if I have additional questions?

For questions about how CEE summer quarter courses may fit into your degree program, ask your advisor.  For inquiries about Summer Quarter 2020 enrollment, please e-mail ceesummerquarter@lists.stanford.edu.